Friday, 3 April 2015

NEAR DEATH EXPERIENCE - UN COEUR SIMPLE - JOSEPH CAMPBELL



Felicité is a servant girl.

As Felicité is dying, she thinks that she meets the Holy Spirit.

The skeptic would say that she is deceived.

The non-skeptic would say that she may well have encountered the Holy Spirit.

Felicité is a fictional character in Gustave Flaubert's short story entitled A Simple Heart, or Le Perroquet.



"Felicité is very loyal, and easily lends her affections to the two children of her mistress, Mme Aubain.

"She gives entirely to others; although many take advantage of her, she is unaffected.

"She has no husband, no children, and no property, and is reliant on her mistress to keep her; she is uneducated, which bars her visits to the Church; her death is virtually unnoticed.

"Despite her life being seemingly pointless, she has within her the power to love, which she does even when she does not receive it in return."



Félicité has a beloved parrot called Loulou whom she has 'stuffed' when it dies.

"As she finally passed from this world to the next, Félicité thought she saw a gigantic parrot hovering in the opening heavens above her."


Flaubert

Flaubert was unlike Félicité.

"Flaubert was very open about his sexual activities with (male and female) prostitutes...

"He engaged in intercourse with male prostitutes in Beirut and Egypt; in one of his letters, he describes a "pockmarked young rascal wearing a white turban".[7][8]

flauberts-parrot / Gustave Flaubert on Wikipedia / "Three Tales" by Gustave Flaubert on Wikipedia

...

Anonymous writes:

Félicité's name is no accident.

The author of course knew it's derived from the Latin word for happiness.

Yes, the happiest people are those who care for others in humble simplicity.

The most miserable people are the envious, the pretentious, who seek adulation, to be better than those around them. Those who chase their vain desires to the detriment of others. Never satisfied with what they have. In futility, trying to fill a bottomless void with more of the same selfishness.

The diametric opposite of Félicité is Madame Bovary, having little loyalty to or appreciation of those who love her. In a vain and never-ending quest for more - for herself. Dying in misery and pain. And leaving behind those who need her.

A parable in two stories.

The kingdom of heaven and the depths of hell are within us.

Which we choose is up to us.


nhneneardeath.ning.com.

What about 'real-life' Near-Death Experiences?

The skeptics will call into question the evidence.

In 1977, at a hospital in Seattle, a migrant worker called 'Maria' had an Near Death Experience during a cardiac arrest.

"She later told her social worker that while doctors were resuscitating her, she found herself floating outside the hospital building and saw a tennis shoe on a third-floor window ledge, which she described in some detail.

"The social worker went to the window Maria had indicated, and not only found the shoe but said that the way it was placed meant there was no way Maria could have seen all the details she described from inside her hospital room."

The social worker, Kimberly Clark Sharp, is still alive and available for interview.

But nobody knows the current whereabouts of Maria and so she is not available to confirm the story.

The Science of Near-Death Experiences - The Atlantic.

The skeptics will say that the story is not confirmed as being true.

First hint of 'life after death' in biggest ever scientific ...The Daily Telegraph‎ - Oct 2014.

...

Might the Near Death Experience (NDE) have a purpose?

The NDE "is similar to the hero's journey, or quest narrative, the structure that the American writer and mythologist Joseph Campbell identified and named the monomyth in 1949.

"The quest underlies just about every form of storytelling, from religious myth to Greek epic to Hollywood blockbuster to personal memoir.

"In this structure, a protagonist is shaken out of his normal way of life by some disturbance and - often reluctantly at first, but at the urging of some kind of mentor or wise figure - strikes out on a journey to an unfamiliar realm.

"There he faces tests, battles enemies, questions the loyalty of friends and allies, withstands a climactic ordeal, teeters on the brink of failure or death, and ultimately returns to where he began, victorious but in some way transformed."

The Science of Near-Death Experiences - The Atlantic.


davidrjolly.wordpress.com.



Campbell: "Have you ever read Sinclair LewisBabbitt?"
Moyers: "Not in a long time."
Campbell: "Remember the last line? 'I have never done a thing that I wanted to do in all my life.' That is a man who never followed his bliss."[20]

13 comments:

  1. This is one of the best sites about Near Death Experience Science, with many interviews with the leading researchers in the field, my own feeling is that the evidence for survival of consciousness after the death of the brain is sufficient. But I would definitely recommend people spend some time listening to the podcasts on this site, especially all the ones about NDEs and OBEs, then make your own mind up. Here is the link to the talks specifically about NDES from the last few years:
    http://www.skeptiko.com/category/near-death-experience/

    ReplyDelete
  2. Jospeh Campbell and his 'Hero with a Thousand Faces' is a fine read.Now the OT:

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Ever searched for some site online and wondered why the heck you can't find it ??

    When some big name sends mails like the one provided in the link, you know it.

    http://pastebin.com/Z5XcmFMJ

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    ReplyDelete
  3. Gentle thoughts Aangirfan. Skeptics respected. Shaken out of (our) normal way of life. I look for someone to quote on, un cœur simple: a simple heart.

    Jean Vanier won the 2015 Templeton Prize. L’Arche (The Ark) was family of the poor, the weak, the challenged, the able-bodied — all in some way broken — “that rises above prejudice and fear of difference,” that recognizes “our need for others,” that finds meaning and dignity in “the simple, humble gestures of daily living.”

    Mark

    ReplyDelete
  4. I should have said IS a family of the poor. There are now 147 L’Arche communities in 35 countries on five continents. There are 29 in Canada, from Vancouver Island to Cape Breton. Mark.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Did you know the brain releases large quantities of DMT during near death experiences? The visual chemical, the seekers in Peru take with shaman from Ayahuasca.

    It's my birthday :) thanks for your wonderful blog.

    A journey ensues in which all aspects of the individuals life appear to them, both the bad and the good. It purges the soul, the repressed memory... Whether the journeyman wishes to go to these places or not.

    Sounds quite like the old phrase "my life flashed before my eyes"

    The tarot is a story, as is the wizard of Oz - it is the story of the journey to enlightenment. However the story forever repeats, for there is no end but the beginning.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

      - from Aangirfan

      Delete
  6. My apologies. Did my comment not arrive, or did you not care for it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Gracie,

      I always like your comments.

      Maybe you could send it again.

      - Aangirfan

      Delete
    2. It was about my own near death experience, where I went into the light and visited with my brother who died a couple of year before. It was very beautiful there, and I wanted to stay but my brother told me I had to go back because my daughter needed me. The experience left me with no fear of death because now I know that the ones who have gone before us will be waiting, and that its only a transition.

      A most excellent book on the subject is "Matthew tell me about Heaven" by Suzanne Ward. It explains my own experience and adds insight to it.

      Thanks for the skeptiko link, anonymous. That looks worth checking out.

      Delete
    3. I would love to hear more about your near death experience.

      - Aangirfan.

      Delete
  7. Joseph Campbell was a fraud! He ripped off Carl Jung's work. Students in Campbell's classes said he acted like an a- -. There is no 'hero's' journey once you cross over into the other dimension....and out of body experiences have nothing to do with Campbell or his nonsense. Read Robert Monroe's "Journeys Out of the Body." Campbell's dissociated, non-stop monologues are a sign of his lack of true understanding

    ReplyDelete
  8. "I'm as free as a bird now. And my soul you cannot chain."
    ---

    Félicité's name is no accident.

    The author of course knew it's derived from the Latin word for happiness.

    Yes, the happiest people are those who care for others in humble simplicity.

    The most miserable people are the envious, the pretentious, who seek adulation, to be better than those around them. Those who chase their vain desires to the detriment of others. Never satisfied with what they have. In futility, trying to fill a bottomless void with more of the same selfishness.

    The diametric opposite of Félicité is Madame Bovary, having little loyalty or appreciation of those who love her. In a vain and never-ending quest for more --- for herself. Dying in misery and pain. And leaving behind those who need her.

    A parable in two stories.

    The kingdom of heaven and the depths of hell are within us.
    Which we choose is up to us.

    ---
    "Et, croyant qu'il voulait jouer, elle le poussa doucement. Il tomba par terre. Il était mort."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Many thanks for the valuable comment.

      - Aangirfan.

      Delete