Tuesday, 11 February 2020

BORIS'S SCOTLAND-IRELAND BRIDGE

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Boris Johnson wants a bridge built between Northern Ireland and Dumfries and Galloway, in Scotland.

In Dumfries and Galloway, there are no motorways, many of the railway lines have been closed, and the roads are narrow and twisting.

Better to spend the money on motorways and railways on land.

Boris Johnson's bridge could be like the one that once crossed the River Tay and which fell down.

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"Beautiful Railway Bridge of the Silv'ry Tay!
"Alas! I am very sorry to say
"That ninety lives have been taken away
"On the last Sabbath day of 1879,
"Which will be remember’d for a very long time."

5 comments:

  1. I also heard he is building a bridge to the moon. He's going to drill through the firmament.

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  2. Boris wants his "Boris bridge" for the symbolism. It's a vanity project. Hey, Tory voters in southern England, look at this. I DO care about other parts of the UK, really...l honest!

    If I authorised investment in Scottish and Northern Irish buses, trains and roads, that wouldn't necessarily register with my southern England Tory voters. Sure, it would massively benefit the Scots and Northern Irish themselves, but I couldn't care less about them because they don't vote Tory anyway, But a "Boris bridge" ? No one in the south possibly be oblivious to such a thing being built. Pure political theatre.

    And not incidentally, one of the things that (some) southern England Tory voters like to tell themselves is that they genuinely care about the Union (even though they couldn't tell you the first thing about Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales, or for that matter, northern England.)

    So the Boris Bridge can also be used by Boris to imply that he cares about strengthening the Union.... which may fire up the few Scottish and Welsh Tories that remain to campaign for him in future elections. When the Unionists in Northern Ireland complain that Boris has sold them down the river with his Brexit deal, he can also point to his ridiculous bridge as "evidence" that he cares passionately about "Ulster" and defeating the "threat" of Sinn Fein's growing popularity.

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  3. If the government has got billions to spend on something as unnecessary as a bridge, why is the health service in such a mess because of lack of funds and why are more and more people turning to food banks and/or sleeping on the street because of lack of funds? Anyway, with any luck, Ireland will be unified one day not too far hence.

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  4. Their is no commercial viability in the project whatsoever. If we leave aside for 1 second the multi billion pound cost of the project. The feasibility of building something 20 miles long in the Irish sea is beyond the engineering skills currently known.

    The sea is 175 metres deep at the Mull of Galloway and the distance of 20 miles across is just ridiculous.

    Not possible I'm afraid. Digging a hole to France (about the same distance) is an tunnelling and engineering masterclass. The challenges, however are nothing compared to a bridge of the same distance. There are much longer bridges in shallow water. Not the same thing though.

    Engineering aside. Money. A commercially viable tunnel operation between a very large economy and an even larger trading block makes financial sense - its commercially viable.

    On the other hand, the most expensive bridge in history (which can't be built) between a crime ridden depressed BACKWATER (Scotland) and a country that only exists because of state subsidies (NI) is off the stupid scale and beyond ridiculous.

    Ambitious mega structures would never be built with any such dillusions when the costs would be off the scale. It would make hs2 look like good value for money by comparison.

    This is just another distraction and pointless pile of nonsense.

    Peace

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    Replies
    1. That and the fact that the MoD dumped millions of tons of munitions there from the end of WWII until the late 1970s.

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